David Ian Smith Furniture

The Commissioning process
Computer image of proposed cabinet
Computer generated image of proposed cabinet.
Commissioning My experience has shown that words like “Commissioning” and “Bespoke “ tend to introduce a feeling of trepidation into some customers as if they are concerned that they are getting into something deeper than they expected. All they wanted was some piece of furniture that they could not find on the high street, something built to a specific size, or something to store and show of their collection of wonderful items. Commissioning furniture is often misunderstood because it is looked at as a long involved process of artistic development.  Well it can be if you want it to be but it can also be a straightforward trouble free experience, just like employing a plumber or an electrician. The process can be as simple as you like, you simply tell me what you want and I will quote and make it for you. Alternatively you can be deeply involved in the process of design and development.
The commissioning process: 1: You have something in mind that you want, whether it’s a piece of practical furniture or an artistic piece to make a statement in your home. 2: We meet and discuss your requirements in detail; this includes seeing your existing décor discussing your likes and dislikes, looking at timber samples and finishes, doing rough sketches and taking measurements and photos of the location. It’s a good idea to get a feel for the budget at this point so there are no misunderstandings later on in the process. 3: I go away and develop the idea into two or three basic designs, the client usually has input during this period as they spend time thinking about our meeting. I like to keep in contact by e-mail it allows sketches to be sent back and forth quickly. I usually use Computer design systems to draw, this way modifications can be made quickly and without to much delay. 4: As the process develops into a single design I produce a more accurate drawing and start to price the piece. 5: Once the final design is developed a quotation is produced which covers the full cost including delivery and an estimate of the delivery period. Depending on the project delivery times can be from just a few weeks to several months. Most projects will require a deposit and stage payments. 6: Once work starts I keep you informed of progress and let you know when critical stages have been reached. If we are in contact by e-mail I like to send photos of key stages. The client is welcome to visit the workshop at any time during the process. 7: Once completed the piece is delivered and if there is any assembly work required then this will be included in the price of the commission.
The Cost There is no point in denying it; individually designed pieces of furniture will be more expensive than the high street stores. But the cost is relative to the product. If you are looking for a complex piece of furniture in solid wood with hand cut dovetailed drawers and highly polished finish then The cost will reflect the work involved in producing the piece. There is a lot of materials, time and skill involved. On the other hand! If you need a basic piece of furniture and you can’t find the right size on the high street. I can make one to fit. However I still cannot compete with the mass production of the high street store’s What you will get in both cases is value for money.

David Ian Smith Furniture

The Commissioning process
Computer image of proposed cabinet
Computer generated image of proposed cabinet.
Commissioning My experience has shown that words like “Commissioning” and “Bespoke “ tend to introduce a feeling of trepidation into some customers as if they are concerned that they are getting into something deeper than they expected. All they wanted was some piece of furniture that they could not find on the high street, something built to a specific size, or something to store and show of their collection of wonderful items. Commissioning furniture is often misunderstood because it is looked at as a long involved process of artistic development.  Well it can be if you want it to be but it can also be a straightforward trouble free experience, just like employing a plumber or an electrician. The process can be as simple as you like, you simply tell me what you want and I will quote and make it for you. Alternatively you can be deeply involved in the process of design and development.
The commissioning process: 1: You have something in mind that you want, whether it’s a piece of practical furniture or an artistic piece to make a statement in your home. 2: We meet and discuss your requirements in detail; this includes seeing your existing décor discussing your likes and dislikes, looking at timber samples and finishes, doing rough sketches and taking measurements and photos of the location. It’s a good idea to get a feel for the budget at this point so there are no misunderstandings later on in the process. 3: I go away and develop the idea into two or three basic designs, the client usually has input during this period as they spend time thinking about our meeting. I like to keep in contact by e-mail it allows sketches to be sent back and forth quickly. I usually use Computer design systems to draw, this way modifications can be made quickly and without to much delay. 4: As the process develops into a single design I produce a more accurate drawing and start to price the piece. 5: Once the final design is developed a quotation is produced which covers the full cost including delivery and an estimate of the delivery period. Depending on the project delivery times can be from just a few weeks to several months. Most projects will require a deposit and stage payments. 6: Once work starts I keep you informed of progress and let you know when critical stages have been reached. If we are in contact by e-mail I like to send photos of key stages. The client is welcome to visit the workshop at any time during the process. 7: Once completed the piece is delivered and if there is any assembly work required then this will be included in the price of the commission.
The Cost There is no point in denying it; individually designed pieces of furniture will be more expensive than the high street stores. But the cost is relative to the product. If you are looking for a complex piece of furniture in solid wood with hand cut dovetailed drawers and highly polished finish then The cost will reflect the work involved in producing the piece. There is a lot of materials, time and skill involved. On the other hand! If you need a basic piece of furniture and you can’t find the right size on the high street. I can make one to fit. However I still cannot compete with the mass production of the high street store’s What you will get in both cases is value for money.